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Professor Stuart Green photo
Education:
J.D., Yale
B.A., Tufts
Courses:
Criminal Law, Criminal Adjudication, Advanced Topics in Criminal Law Seminar, White Collar Crime Seminar
Contact:
Links:
Professor Green’s SSRN page and the Criminal Law and Criminal Justice Books website, of which he is co-editor.

Faculty Profile (Back to Menu)

Stuart P. Green

Distinguished Professor of Law and Nathan L. Jacobs Scholar

Professor Green received a B.A. in philosophy from Tufts University and a J.D. from Yale Law School, where he was a notes editor of the Yale Law Journal. After law school, he clerked for Judge Pamela Ann Rymer of the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in Los Angeles and then served as an associate with the law firm of Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering in Washington, DC. Prior to joining the Rutgers faculty, Green taught at the Louisiana State University Law School. 

Green’s books – which have been translated, in whole or in part, into Spanish, Italian, Russian, Turkish, and Korean – include the award-winning book Lying, Cheating, and Stealing: A Moral Theory of White Collar Crime (2006), Thirteen Ways to Steal a Bicycle: Theft Law in the Information Age (2012), and Philosophical Foundations of Criminal Law (co-edited with Antony Duff) (2011). He is currently working on a new book, titled Criminalizing Sex, which will offer a “unified” theory of the non-consensual and consensual sexual offenses. 

Green has served as a visiting professor or visiting fellow at the Universities of Oxford, Michigan, Melbourne, and Glasgow, and at the Australian National University. He has also served as consultant to the Law Commission for England and Wales. In late 2014, he will teach a course at the University of Tel Aviv School of Law.

Professor Green is a founding co-editor of Criminal Law and Criminal Justice Books and a frequent media commentator on issues in criminal law and ethics. 


RECENT PUBLICATIONS

Books


Thirteen Ways to Steal a Bicycle: Theft Law in the Information Age (Harvard University Press, May 2012)

Philosophical Foundations of Criminal Law (co-edited with R.A. Duff) (Oxford University Press, 2011)

Lying, Cheating, and Stealing: A Moral Theory of White Collar Crime (Oxford University Press, 2006; paperback edition, 2007)

Defining Crimes: Essays on the Special Part of the Criminal Law (co-edited with R.A. Duff) (Oxford University Press, 2005)


Book Chapters and Articles

“Property Offenses,” in Markus Dubber and Tatjana Hörnle (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Criminal Law (Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2014)

“Official Bribery and Commercial Bribery: Should They Be Distinguished?,” in Jeremy Horder and Peter Alldridge (eds.), Modern Bribery Law: Comparative Perspectives (Cambridge University Press, 2013)

“Vice Crimes and Preventive Justice,” 8 Criminal Law and Philosophy (forthcoming, 2013)

Foreword to New England Law Review sysmposium on Thirteen Ways to Steal a Bicycle (forthcoming, 2013)

Prefacio a la edicion en Castellano, Mentir, hacer trampas y apropiarse de lo ajeno (Marcel Pons Publishers, 2013) (preface to Spanish edition of Lying, Cheating, and Stealing: A Moral Theory of White Collar Crime)

Foreword to Symposium on Vice and the Criminal Law, 7 Criminal Law & Philosophy 3 (2013)

“Bribery,” in Lawrence M. Salinger (ed.), Encyclopedia of White-Collar and Corporate Crime (Sage Reference, 2d ed., 2013)

“When is it Wrong to Trade Stocks on the Basis of Non-Public Information? Public Views of the Morality of Insider Trading” (with Matthew Kugler), 39 Fordham Urban Law Journal 445 (2012) (symposium).

“Public Perceptions of White Collar Crime Seriousness: Bribery, Perjury, and Fraud” (with Matthew Kugler), 75 Law & Contemporary Problems 33 (2012) (symposium) 

“Thieving and Receiving: Overcriminalizing the Possession of Stolen Property,” 14 New Criminal Law Review 35 (2011)

“Taking It to the Streets,” 89 Texas Law Review 61 (2011), (responding to Paul Robinson, Michael Cahill, and Daniel Bartels, “Competing Theories of Blackmail: An Empirical Research Critique of Criminal Law Theory”)

“Hard Times, Hard Time: Retributive Justice for Unjustly Disadvantaged Offenders,” in 2010 University of Chicago Legal Forum 21-48 (symposium), published in revised form as “Just Deserts in Unjust Societies: A Case-Specific Approach,” in Philosophical Foundations of Criminal Law, above

“Golden Rule Ethics and the Death of the Criminal Law’s Special Part,” 29 Criminal Justice Ethics 208 (2010) (reviewing Larry Alexander & Kim Ferzan, Crime and Culpability)

“Theft by Omission,” in James Chalmers, Lindsay Farmer, and Fiona Leverick (eds.), Essays in Criminal Law in Honour of Sir Gerald Gordon (Edinburgh University Press, 2010)

“Community Perceptions of Theft Seriousness: A Challenge to Model Penal Code and English Theft Act Consolidation” (with Matthew Kugler), 7 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies 511 (2010)

“Cheating,” “Strict Liability,” and “White Collar Crime,” in Hugh LaFollette (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics (Wiley-Blackwell, forthcoming 2012)

“What is Wrong with Tax Evasion?,” 9 Houston Business and Tax Law Journal 221 (2009)

“Is There Too Much Criminal Law?,” 6 Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law 737 (2009) (reviewing Douglas Husak, Overcriminalization)

“Why Do Privately-Inflicted Criminal Sanctions Matter?” and “Sharing Wrongs Between Criminal and Civil Sanctions,” in Paul H. Robinson, Stephen Garvey, and Kimberly Ferzan (eds.), Criminal Law Conversations (Oxford University Press, 2009)