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Lori St. John ’00, Author of Book About Wrongful Conviction, to Speak on Nov. 25

November 18, 2013 – 

Lori St. John, a Class of 2000 graduate who founded and directed the law school’s former Innocence Project, will return to Rutgers School of Law–Newark on Monday, November 25, 2013 to speak about “Protecting the Innocent.”

St. John book

St. John is author of the new book The Corruption of Innocence: A Journey for Justice (Creative Production Services, 2013), which details her four-year fight to save the life of Joseph Roger O’Dell III, who was executed for murder in 1997. Prior to law school, St. John was doing volunteer work when she discovered the O’Dell case and, convinced of his innocence, brought international attention to efforts to stop the execution. 

Sister Helen Prejean, author of Dead Man Walking, says of the St. John book: “This amazing story of a woman’s valiant attempts to save an innocent man from execution might seem like a hyped-up overwrought suspense novel. But everything told in these pages actually happened. Fasten your seat belt. It’s going to take you for quite a ride.”

After receiving her J.D., St. John was an associate deputy public defender for the Adult Felony Division of the Essex County Public Defender’s Office. She then litigated criminal cases in Colorado’s adult felony court and did post-conviction appellate work for the state’s Alternate Defense Counsel.

In addition to providing an overview of the case at the heart of her book, St. John will update the audience on the legal landscape of wrongful convictions and exonerations and offer effective principles and practices for effective litigation.

What:“Protecting the Innocent”
Who:Lori St. John ’00, author of The Corruption of Innocence: A Journey for Justice
When:5:00 pm, Monday, November 25, 2013
Where:Justice Robert N. Wilentz Appellate Courtroom (room 122), Rutgers School of Law–Newark